Author: Linda Viertel

Icons of Modern Art: The Shchukin Collection

Just the thought of seeing even half of Sergei Shchukin’s iconic art collection amassed in one place sent me reeling when I read about the current exhibit in Paris. Never having traveled to St. Petersburg’s Hermitage or Moscow’s Pushkin Museums, …Read More

Dining in Paris – Le Baratin

Time to forego all the Michelin one-, two- and three-star discussions/restaurant visits and experience where many of Paris’ greatest chefs go to dine when they crave bistro home-cooking at its finest — lovingly created in a tiny kitchen by Raquel …Read More

The Salt of the Earth

  Don’t miss Wim Wenders’ documentary whose subject, Sebastaio Salgado, is, in my estimation, the greatest living photographer. (You may have seen his “Genesis” exhibit featuring grand, pristine landscapes at ICP and accompanying the U.N. Climate Summit.) Having spent 40 …Read More

Thomas Hart Benton’s “America Today” at the Metropolitan Museum

Whatever you think of Thomas Hart Benton, don’t miss this ten-panel mural installation that recreates the New School for Social Research’s boardroom, where it hung beginning in 1930. Having survived several moves, the mural has been given a sensitive restoration …Read More

Moro at the Exmouth Market, London

My choice for a favorite informal birthday lunch or dinner during our early December trips to London has always been Moro at the Exmouth Market, an easy 15-minute walk from West End theatre-going accommodations. (Reservations for both are essential.) Owner-chefs …Read More

My Promised Land

  If ever there was a time to read Ari Shavit’s My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel,” that time is now. A geopolitical history of Israel/Palestine, laced with personal narratives, fascinating biographies of key lesser-known figures in …Read More

Edward Burtynsky: Water

At the New Orleans Contemporary Arts Center. What an overwhelming surprise to witness Burtynsky’s large format digital photography at the CAC, a serendipitous suggestion from new Louisiana friends who met us in New Orleans last week. A transformative photography show …Read More

Letter from London

In the not-too-distant past, dining out in London meant roast beef and Yorkshire pudding at Simpsons-In–The-Strand or Rules, or standards at Noel Coward’s venerated theatre hang-out, The Ivy. The finest cooking, by far, was to be had in any number …Read More

Letter from Georgia

Atlanta, Georgia, might be considered an unusual getaway spot, but if business or curiosity take you there, you will be pleasantly surprised. First stop: the High Museum, where the current exhibit, “Girl With A Peal Earring; Dutch Paintings from the …Read More

Letter from Sonoma/Napa

Visiting northern California’s wine country is always memorable, even as Napa’s Highway 29 becomes more crowded each year; it’s definitely a transformation from our first trip 35 years ago. Even after multiple visits over the years, new delights awaited us …Read More

Letter from Sonoma/Napa

Visiting northern California’s wine country is always memorable, even as Napa’s Highway 29 becomes more crowded each year; it’s definitely a transformation from our first trip 35 years ago. Even after multiple visits over the years, new delights awaited us …Read More

Four Freedoms Park

Spring is here, and what better way to celebrate rebirth than with a trip to the Louis Kahn-designed Four Freedoms Park on Roosevelt Island?  Taking the tram across the East River at 59th and Second Avenue connects you to Roosevelt Island’s red bus …Read More

Great and Mighty Things: Outsider Art from the Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Collection

A day trip to the Philadelphia Museum is well worth the drive. Two hundred works by self-taught artists — the Bonovitz’s purchased what they loved  —  compelling pieces by more well-known outsider artists such as  Howard Finster, William Edmondson, and Bill Traylor complement …Read More

The Impressionist Line from Degas to Toulouse-Lautrec: Drawings and Prints from the Clark

This was a happy surprise on my visit to the Frick, on view in the downstairs gallery and “the cabinet room.”  Prints by Degas, Renoir, Millet, Gauguin, Courbet, Morisot, and Toulouse-Lautrec reveal a mastery of print making, line and color. From …Read More

Piero Della Francesca in America

A visit to the Frick Museum to see this exhibit is a must for anyone who reveres the Italian Renaissance. There you will enjoy seven works by Piero, including six panels from the Sant’Agostino altarpiece, all masterfully displayed. An illustrative …Read More

Designing Tomorrow: America’s World’s Fairs of the 1930s

At the Museum of the City of New York. Even if you have a pretty good idea of what the 1939-40 New York World’s Fair was all about, or read Robert Caro’s brilliant The Power Broker or E. L. Doctorow’s World’s Fair: A Novel, …Read More

International Center of Photography

Don’t miss ICP’s two current photography exhibits: Roman Vishniac Rediscovered and We Went Back: Photographs from Europe 1933-1956 by Chim.  Both retrospectives shed new light on two well-known photographers whose many iconic images still take one’s breath away. You will see several of …Read More

Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

Amidst the compelling welter of New York City’s museums, galleries, and exhibit spaces is a hidden gem from New York University.  It’s located in a beautiful East Side 84th Street townhouse gifted by Shelby White and Leon Levy in  2004. …Read More